Teen Life in Africa

edited by Toyin Falola

Teen Life in Africa

Thanks to its population growth rate, Africa has one of the highest numbers of teenagers in the world. This book explores the lives, cultures, and opportunities of African teens, offering students and general readers a substantial understanding of this important group.

Nigerian Cities

edited by Toyin Falola and Steven J. Salm

Nigerian Cities

The growth of Nigeria’s urban population has been phenomenal, with Lagos being one of the fastest growing cities in the world. Rapid growth also brings problems, notably the shortage of social amenities, crime and violence. Drawing on specific examples from Lagos, Abeokuta, and Kano, among others, the book examines various issues on the management of modern Nigerian cities. The movement of peoples and goods, improving sanitation, and minimizing ethnic tension in the cities engage readers in the volume. The book addresses the concerns of scholars, experts, and policy makers. Contributors, writing mainly about the cities in which they live, combine data and practical experience to provide original analysis on the state of Nigerian cities in the last one hundred years.

Globalization and Urbanization in Africa

edited by Toyin Falola and Steven J. Salm

Globalization and Urbanization in Africa

Scholars present new interpretations of African cities, from the pre-colonial to the modern, set in the context of national and international economy, politics and culture. While providing insights into the evolution of African cities, they also raise issues of vital importance to the survival of African cities. The chapters capture the mixed legacies of colonialism and the lingering consequences of neo-colonialism in a so-called age of globalization.

Economic Reforms and Modernization in Nigeria, 1945-1965

by Toyin Falola

Economic Reforms and Modernization in Nigeria, 1945-1965

Created as a result of British colonialism, Nigeria emerged as a nation-state during the mid-twentieth century. A rapid transformation in Nigeria's economy and political arena took place as a result of the transfer of power, with the first generation of the new political class inheriting power during the 1950s as colonialism ended. An age of ideas and actions began, and the country witnessed an expansion of its infrastructure, health services, schools, and industries. These were the first crucial steps in Nigeria's march toward modernization. Early on the agenda of the emerging nation-state was the issue of economic development and the banishment of poverty. Unfortunately, Nigeria's focus switched from economic development to political opportunism. Politics became a competition between ethnic groups instead of a fight against colonialism. Economic Reforms and Modernization in Nigeria details the process and outcome of late-colonial and post-colonial Nigerian history. While its focus is on economic reforms, it includes a discussion of twentieth-century politics in order to place the events of the period in context.

Africa in the Twentieth Century: The Adu Boahen Reader

edited by Toyin Falola

Africa in the Twentieth Century: The Adu Boahen Reader

Adu Boahen was one of the most influential scholars of Ghana. His dedication to the teaching of African history was indisputable, and his career was wide-ranging and successful. This compilation of Boahen's essays is a celebration of his scholarship and a testament to the career of a great man, capturing the importance of Boahen’s work and the lasting contributions that he has made to African history. Offering the reader a unique chance to read various essays that have previously gone unpublished, the volume also reflects the thinking of Africa's postcolonial scholars and provides the new and future generation with ideas to understand their continent and themselves as well.

A Mouth Sweeter Than Salt: An African Memoir

edited by Toyin Falola

An African Memoir

A Mouth Sweeter Than Salt gathers the stories and reflections of the early years of Toyin Falola, the grand historian of Africa and one of the greatest sons of Ibadan, the notable Yoruba city-state in Nigeria. Redefining the autobiographical genre altogether, Falola miraculously weaves together personal, historical, and communal stories, along with political and cultural developments in the period immediately preceding and following Nigeria's independence, to give us a unique and enduring picture of the Yoruba in the mid-twentieth century. This is truly a literary memoir, told in language rich with proverbs, poetry, song, and humor. Falola's memoir is far more than the story of one man's childhood experiences; rather, he presents us with the riches of an entire culture and community—its history, traditions, pleasures, mysteries, household arrangements, forms of power, struggles, and transformations.